Often asked: How To Make Concrete Fence Posts?

How do you make concrete fence posts?

In terms of the ratio to use for a concreting fence posts, the best mix is a mix of 1:2:4 (1 cement, 2 sand, 4 aggregate). Concrete is always best mixed using a cement mixer to ensure it’s even, but if you only need to mix a little, hand mixing is ok (see mixing concrete project above for tips on how to do this).

How deep should a concrete fence post be?

For example, if you have a 3 inch wide post that you need to sit over 1.83m (6ft) in height above the ground, we recommend the hole size should be: 230mm [wide] (9”) x 600mm [depth]. This rule of thumb that can be followed for all size posts (e.g. a 6ft high fence would require a hole depth of at least 600mm or 2ft).

What concrete should I use for fence posts?

Fast-setting concrete is ideal for installing fence posts since it doesn’t need to be mixed in a bucket or a wheelbarrow. Once you’ve finished digging your post holes, add about three to four inches of gravel into the bottom and compact it using a post or a 2×4.

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Should I use concrete or cement for fence posts?

Concrete is the most secure material for setting fence posts, especially if you have sandy soil. Gravel may be okay with dense, clay-heavy soil, but in looser soil, concrete is the only thing that will truly keep your fence posts stuck in place.

How do you keep fence posts from rotting in concrete?

Caulk Around the Fence Post Base



Apply high-quality exterior acrylic latex caulk, or silicone specifically designed to adhere to concrete, at the base of the post.

Is 2 feet deep enough for fence posts?

Project Instructions



The depth of the hole should be 1/3-1/2 the post height above ground (i.e., a 6-foot tall fence would require a hole depth of at least 2 feet).

How many bags of Postcrete do you need per post?

You’ll need to bury the posts at least 2ft In the ground. As for how many bags of postcrete you need per post, that’s purely dependant on how big you make the post holes. As a rule of thumb, when using standard post hole diggers, I average 1 bag per post. For larger holes I would allow 1.5 bags to 2 bags per hole.

How long will a treated 4×4 post last in the ground?

The treated post that are rated for ground contact are guaranteed for 40 years.

Will concrete rot fence posts?

A: Actually, your point is well taken. Simply setting the posts in concrete does create a condition that will accelerate rot in the bottom of the posts. With pressure-treated posts, the rot will be slow. The concrete at the top should be sloped away from the post to grade level to avoid water pooling around the base.

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Do you need gravel under concrete?

Whether you pour concrete for a walkway or patio, a strong gravel base is required to prevent the concrete from cracking and shifting. Gravel is especially important in clay soil because it doesn’t drain well, which results in water pooling under the concrete slab and slowly eroding the soil as it finally drains.

How many bags of concrete do I need for a 10×20 slab?

A 60-pound bag yields. 017 cubic yards, and an 80-pound bag yields. 022 cubic yards. For a 10 x 10 slab, you would need 77 60-pound bags or 60 80-pound bags.

Does filling a post with concrete make it stronger?

Filling with concrete is not as effective as increasing wall thickness or changing the shape, but it’s a proven technique.

Should aluminum fence posts be set in concrete?

You tend to get a better long-term result by setting the fence posts in concrete as opposed to gravel. When setting fence posts in concrete, it’s best to let the concrete dry for three or four days before attaching your fence rails, panels or pickets.

How long will wooden posts last in concrete?

Life expectancy of posts now is anywhere from 18 months to 5-7 years max. This then got me thinking that the 100mm x 200mm sleepers I had planned to use to create a bank for the stream – up ended vertically with 1/3 buried in the ground – probably won’t last too long either.

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